Negroni Sbagliato cocktails

Negroni Sbagliato

By Timo Torner / Last updated on October 29, 2022 

First published on December 9, 2021 

The Negroni Sbagliato literally is an "incorrect" or "faulty" Negroni, which translates to the sparkling variation of the classic Negroni cocktail.

The basis for the Negroni Sbagliato is the classic Negroni, one of my all-time favorite cocktails. It is a perfectly balanced, bitter, and dark red mix of Campari, Sweet Vermouth, and Dry Gin. It's an uncomplicated and straightforward recipe. 

Having said this, the Negroni Sbagliato was an accidental creation. That even shows in the name of the drink. Sbagliato is Italian for "wrong" or "incorrect". 

But the result of this error is a dazzling drink, that even has prominent fans like Emma D’Arcy from the popular Netflix series House of the Dragon

It is a sparkling take on a classic Italian aperitivo cocktail that is truly unique. And the story behind the Negroni Sbagliato is also quite interesting.

Ingredients of the Negroni Sbagliato

Instead of the Gin, the Negroni Sbagliato calls for some Italian bubbly, changing the list of ingredients to Sweet Vermouth, Campari, and Prosecco.

Replacing the Gin with Prosecco leads to a sparkling, lower-ABV version of the classic Negroni. 

The Prosecco should be a "spumante" not "frizzante", at least if you prefer your Negroni Sbagliato properly sparkling. 

Prosecco "frizzante" is semi-sparkling and will fall flat much quicker than a spumante, especially when mixed with Campari and Vermouth.

Also, the lower sweetness levels of Extra Dry, Brut, or Extra Brut Prosecco are a good match for the Negroni Sbagliato.

History of the Negroni Sbagliato

Perhaps you've already heard the story about how the classic Negroni got invented: A bartender at Caffe Casoni in Florence created a boozy riff on the Americano cocktail for a regular customer, Count Camillo Negroni. Et voilà - a new classic was born.

The red and bittersweet cocktail soon got served all over Italy. And so it happened that the "mistaken" version originates in Milan and not in Florence like the original. 

Bartender serves Negroni Sbagliato

Bar Basso, a renowned cocktail bar in Milan, is credited with inventing the Negroni Sbagliato. As the story goes, a busy bartender confused a bottle of Gin with a bottle of Prosecco while making a Negroni and only realized his mistake when it was too late.

The customer, however, didn't complain. He loved what he received, and the mistake of a bartender led to a new classic recipe. Until today, Bar Basso still serves countless Negroni Sbagliatos on a daily basis. All thanks to a small error.

Recent boost thanks to Emma D’Arcy

Recently, in an Interview with co-star Olivia Cooke (playing Alicent Hohenturm) on HBO Max, actress Emma D'Arcy (Prinzessin Rhaenyra Targaryen) revealed that her current favorite drink is the Negroni Sbagliato.

After that, the Prosecco-based Negroni went viral on Social Media and became a meme on TikTok. It's everywhere, and the beautiful Negroni Sbagliato -along with the classic and other riffs like the White Negroni- are gaining a massive new fanbase and some well-deserved attention.

How to make s sensational Negroni Sbagliato

Sparkling ingredients are delicate. If shaken too strong, mixed too fast, or used too warm, the fizzy bubbles will vanish in an instant. So you should be careful and follow these steps:

First, make sure that all your ingredients are chilled. Vermouth needs to be chilled anyway. But also the Campari and, of course, the Prosecco need to be ice cold.

Second, combine Campari and Sweet Vermouth in a mixing glass with plenty of ice. Then pour into a glass with ice.

Third, pour the Prosecco and give the drink a quick but gentle stir before serving. 

Negroni Sbagliato cocktails

Negroni Sbagliato

A sparkling variation of the classic Negroni cocktail.
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: Campari, Prosecco, vermouth
Servings: 1
Calories: 163kcal
Cost: $2.80

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz Dry Prosecco spumante

Instructions

  • Mix Campari and Sweet Vermouth in a mixing glass with plenty of ice and stir until chilled. Then strain into an ice-filled glass.
  • Top up with Prosecco and gently stir the drink again.
  • Optionally garnish with orange peel or a thin orange slice.

Nutrition

Serving: 4.25oz | Calories: 163kcal | Carbohydrates: 14.9g | Protein: 0.2g | Sodium: 2mg | Potassium: 29mg | Sugar: 14.8g | Calcium: 2mg
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Negroni Sbagliato FAQs

What does sbagliato mean?

The term "Sbagliato" is Italian for "wrong" or "incorrect" and is a reference to the accidental creation of the drink when a bartender added Prosecco instead of Gin to the drink. 

Why is Negroni Sbagliato trending?

The Negroni Sbagliato is trending because of a cast interview between Olivia Cooke and Emma D'Arcy published by HBO Max. House of the Dragon star Emma D'Arcy was asked for her favorite drink to which she replied "a Negroni… Sbagliato. With Prosecco in it". And just like that, the faulty Negroni cocktail went viral.

Which Prosecco for a Negroni Sbagliato?

Always opt for a Prosecco spumante (sparkling) and not a frizzante - which is only semi-sparkling. The latter one falls flat way too quickly.

Who invented the Negroni Sbagliato cocktail?

A bartender working at Bar Basso in Milan, Italy accidentally created the cocktail when he poured Prosecco in instead of Gin.

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4 comments on “Negroni Sbagliato”

  1. 5 stars
    I noticed something that needs an edit: Dry Vermouth is mentioned instead of Sweet Vermouth in one portion of the text (all of the other mentions are correct)

    For reference: “Instead of the Gin, the Negroni Sbagliato calls for some Italian bubbly, changing the list of ingredients to Dry Vermouth, Campari, and Prosecco.“

  2. 5 stars
    A negroni is a bitter cocktail but the vermouth and orange garnish add enough fruity sweetness
    to balance it out. The taste is herby, a bit rooty - think liquorice
    root - and then there are some deep dark fruit flavours.
    The gin is present too so there's that classic juniper tang, notes
    of lemon and coriander seed.

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